What makes a teacher’s day

Posted: March 3, 2011 in Food for thought, Useful advice for students
Tags: ,

It’s been a long, hard day. At this point, am thankful that it’s almost over, just a bit more data analysis, and I can make my date with Jon Stewart.

And then, I check Twitter and see this:

… my husband asks me why I’m smiling ear to ear. I love seeing this happen. This is how the process works: You play around with ideas in blog posts, this makes you think of other ideas, which may lead to interesting new research topics! Yes, that’s one of the main reasons why I ask students to blog. I also love that, with social media, I can be a witness to this process.

But then, there’s more…

Glad to know a tool I recommended is useful, and to see that students are actively collecting sources and doing research.  Strike 2!

I finally head over to read the student’s blog post to see what she was so enthusiastic about and… the post starts by explaining how she was intrigued by a class concept and took it upon herself to look into it further. The drive and curiosity to investigate more… that’s what makes a graduate student. And that’s strike 3, my day could not get better.

Except for…

Now, I’m changing the blog’s title, and getting off Twitter, because even too much of a good thing can be too much. 🙂

This post happens to be about the same student, who happens to be on a roll tonight. But it’s not about the person. It’s about the process, and what you can learn from this entire story:

  1. Follow the process, play with ideas, blog. See what happens.
  2. Do give Zotero a try, and keep collecting references about your area of interest.
  3. Be curious, and follow your curiosity. Don’t rely on teachers to teach you. We make you aware of things. It’s up to you to investigate further.

With gratitude to my students,

Dr. V

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  1. […] Tony V posted about this interesting story. Here is a small section of the postFollow the process, play with ideas, blog. See what happens. Do give Zotero a try, and keep collecting references about your area of interest. Be curious, and follow your curiosity. Don’t rely on teachers to teach you. … […]